Tag: green comet

The Prime – Three-Quarter Report

Credit B4bees – CC-BY


I have been writing my current novel, The Prime, for four and a half months, and I’m three-quarters finished. Time for another report.

Unlike my last book, The Plainsrunner, this one isn’t being shared in a serialization as I write it. Serialization was good and I enjoyed it, but it was a lot of work, and the effort didn’t result in much return. Not many sales, no reviews, and I was left feeling, “What’s the point?”

I’m enjoying writing The Prime, but it still feels strange to not be sharing it as we go. The first one, Green Comet, was released whole and complete, but the second one, Parasite Puppeteers, was released as eight extensions, and the third one, The Francesians, as four. I discovered as I went that there’s a lot of work involved in proofing and formatting and releasing and announcing several different versions of a story, and four is easier than eight. Now, with The Prime, it looks as if I’ve brought it down to zero. Right back to the first one.

So, what am I enjoying about writing The Prime? What I always enjoy about writing. Thinking every day about the growing story and watching it develop as I write it, seeing what happens next. Learning more about my characters as I get to know them better. Showing them where we’re going, and following along as they take us there. And sometimes reining them in as they head off in directions of their own. It’s a bit lonelier this time, writing the whole thing without sharing it as we go, but a writer’s life is supposed to be a lonely one, isn’t it?

Three-quarters done. So far, so good. Another couple of months of writing, then the proofing, preparing it for publication and recording it. Oh yeah, and deciding if this image is right for it.

rjb

The Prime – Halftime Report

Credit David Vignoni – GNU Lesser General Public License


I still haven’t come up with an image to use with this book.

I have been writing my current novel — tentatively titled The Prime — for three months now, and I’m halfway through. That means it’s time for a halftime report, just like during a sports game, or any project where the participants want to assess their work so far. It’s good to see if we’re meeting our goals, and to plan the strategy for the second half.

Unlike my last book — The Plainsrunner — this one isn’t being shared in a serialization as I write it. At least not yet. That serialization was good in many ways, and I mostly enjoyed it. On the negative side, it was a lot of work, and that effort didn’t result in much return. Not only did it not result in many sales, it also didn’t even result in any reviews, and that has left me feeling that there wouldn’t be much point in doing another one.

I would like to say that I’m enjoying writing this book, but it feels strange to not be sharing it as we go. In addition to the serialization of the last one, I have shared portions of other uncompleted novels too. The first one, Green Comet, was released whole and complete. The second one, Parasite Puppeteers, was released as eight extensions, and The Francesians as four. I discovered as I went that there’s a lot of work involved in proofing and formatting and releasing and announcing several different versions of a story, and four is easier than eight. Now, with The Prime, it looks as if I’ve brought it down to zero. Right back to the first one.

So, what am I enjoying about writing The Prime? What I always enjoy about writing. Thinking every day about the growing story. Seeing it develop as I write it, seeing what happens next. Learning more about my characters as I get to know them better. Showing them where we’re going, and following along as they take us there. And sometimes reining them in as they head off in directions of their own.

It’s a bit lonelier this time, writing the whole thing without sharing it as we go, but a writer’s life is supposed to be a lonely one, isn’t it?

So there’s the halftime report on my novel, The Prime. So far, so good. Now it’s another three months of writing, then there’s the proofing, preparing it for publication and recording it. Oh yeah, and finding an image for it. Pen up, head down and back to work.

rjb

Transliterations of Alien Texts


People ask why I use human referents in my stories about aliens. Why, for instance, did Archie take the name Archimedes when his history doesn’t include Archimedes? Shouldn’t Archie have named himself after a great mathematician from his own world? The answer is, he did, and I’ve substituted that alien name with one we recognize immediately. I have communicated why he chose the name without having to write an explanation of his history into the story. I have saved the reader a lot of reading, and myself a lot of writing, if only we agree to imagine the alien equivalent when we see a human referent.

Rather than thinking of these stories as translations of alien texts, I think of them as whole-text transliterations, where I present the human equivalent and not the raw result. So, if you will agree with me to use this shorthand, we will save ourselves both a lot of work.

rjb

Top 10 Posts of 2018

Credit Marjaree Mason Center – CC-BY-SA

Here is the list of the ten posts on Green Comet that got the most visits in 2018.


1. Spanking for Love

Once again Green Comet seems to be a gateway for people who want to learn about spanking their women. Humans are funny little things, aren’t they?


2. Bipedal – The Savanna Theory

Judging from the pattern of hits, I’m guessing that a lot of children find this post after getting a school assignment.


3. Home Page
This makes sense, since it’s the landing page for the site.


4. Ants in the Devil’s Garden

It’s a fascinating story, so I’m not surprised at the interest in it. It’s interesting to speculate about the search parameters that led here. There are some good comments, too.


5. Most Unpleasant Sounds

Once again, how do people end up here? What is the interest in unpleasant sounds?


6. Downloads

This is gratifying. Since the purpose of the Green Comet website is to provide a home on the internet for the Green Comet trilogy, I am pleased that so many people go to the downloads page. In fact, you should do that as soon as you finish reading this post. Download everything. It’s free.


7. Bipedal – The Aquatic Ape Theory

This one is probably linked to #2. They are closely related ideas.

Credit Craig Sunter – CC-BY


8. Cirrus Homogenitus

Everyone loves clouds, and this one is probably particularly interesting because it’s one of the rare new ones designated by the World Meteorological Organization in their International Cloud Atlas.

Photo credit – Ross Cooper


9. Altocumulus Lenticularis

More clouds, and these ones are popular for their striking appearance and their counter-intuitive behavior.


10. Altocumulus Castellanus

More clouds, and again very distinctive in their appearance.

So, that was 2018. I think I’m safe in predicting that the list for 2019 will be similar.

rjb

Thirty Thousand Downloads

Photo credit – Winston Wong


While we were doing something else — serializing and publishing The Plainsrunner — our download count slipped past Thirty Thousand by a comfortable margin. Interest in the Green Comet trilogy continues even when we’re not paying any attention. Way to go, people. We’re doing fine.

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