Welcome to Green Comet

These free novels, Creative Commons licensed Green Comet, and its sequels Parasite Puppeteers and The Francesians, tell an expansive story of love and adventure on an inhabited comet. To learn more about the trilogy, and for samples, visit the Welcome page. To download the books, visit the Free Downloads page.  The novels The Plainsrunner and The Prime are available through the Books for Sale page.

Human Rights – Article Nine

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) is a milestone document in the history of human rights. Drafted by representatives with different legal and cultural backgrounds from all regions of the world, the Declaration was proclaimed by the United Nations General Assembly in Paris on 10 December 1948 (General Assembly resolution 217 A) as a common standard of achievements for all peoples and all nations. It sets out, for the first time, fundamental human rights to be universally protected and it has been translated into over 500 languages.

Article 9.

No one shall be subjected to arbitrary arrest, detention or exile.

Short and clear. While article nine doesn’t say that no one should be arrested, imprisoned or exiled, there has to be a good reason for it. Some autocrat can’t just do it on a whim.

rjb

Sunward – Halftime Report


We’re at the halftime intermission in the writing of Sunward, the final novel in The Plainsrunner trilogy. Time to assess progress and make plans for the second half. It’s what people do, right?

As usual, I’m enjoying writing this book. I always wonder before starting whether it will come easily, and whether I will get swept up in it. As always, the answers are yes. Whenever I sit down in the morning and pick up a pen, the words come. As soon as I get a good opening sentence, I’m good for the day. Also as always, I’m having a lot of fun seeing where the characters want to take me. It’s a case of telling them where we have to be, and then following them around as they take us there. Not that they have completely free rein. Sometimes I have to be firm with them.

I’m glad that I enjoy writing these novels. If I was relying on sales and reviews and other feedback, then I might have lost interest long ago. I got really good responses to the Green Comet trilogy, probably because I actively shared it with a Creative Commons license. With books two and three, I shared them as I wrote them, maintaining the interest of a good body of readers. This second trilogy is another experiment where I’m trying to sell it on commercial sites under a more restrictive copyright. That makes it harder to share, particularly as it is written, and that makes it harder to engage readers. Fortunately, I still enjoy writing, so I’ll keep plugging away. The books might sit on the shelf, possibly for a long time, but it’s not as if they’re going to go bad, is it?

Time to pick up a pen and start writing the second half. Another three or four months to completion.

rjb

Human Rights – Article Eight

Photo Credit: DragonDrop via Wunderstock (license)

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) is a milestone document in the history of human rights. Drafted by representatives with different legal and cultural backgrounds from all regions of the world, the Declaration was proclaimed by the United Nations General Assembly in Paris on 10 December 1948 (General Assembly resolution 217 A) as a common standard of achievements for all peoples and all nations. It sets out, for the first time, fundamental human rights to be universally protected and it has been translated into over 500 languages.

Article 8.

Everyone has the right to an effective remedy by the competent national tribunals for acts violating the fundamental rights granted him by the constitution or by law.

Article eight begins to tell us about the guarantees and remedies all persons are entitled to in the protection of their human rights. The states endorsing the Declaration are obliged to provide these protections.

rjb

Human Rights – Article Seven

Credit John Robertson – CC-BY-ND

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) is a milestone document in the history of human rights. Drafted by representatives with different legal and cultural backgrounds from all regions of the world, the Declaration was proclaimed by the United Nations General Assembly in Paris on 10 December 1948 (General Assembly resolution 217 A) as a common standard of achievements for all peoples and all nations. It sets out, for the first time, fundamental human rights to be universally protected and it has been translated into over 500 languages.

Article 7.

All are equal before the law and are entitled without any discrimination to equal protection of the law. All are entitled to equal protection against any discrimination in violation of this Declaration and against any incitement to such discrimination.

Having established the right to personhood before the law in Article Six, this article proclaims every person’s right to equality before the law. No person shall be discriminated against in their treatment by the law, or in the protection it gives them. No one will be treated preferentially, nor will they be treated less well, nor will anyone incite such inequality against them.

rjb

Human Rights – Article Six

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) is a milestone document in the history of human rights. Drafted by representatives with different legal and cultural backgrounds from all regions of the world, the Declaration was proclaimed by the United Nations General Assembly in Paris on 10 December 1948 (General Assembly resolution 217 A) as a common standard of achievements for all peoples and all nations. It sets out, for the first time, fundamental human rights to be universally protected and it has been translated into over 500 languages.

Article 6.

Everyone has the right to recognition everywhere as a person before the law.

Personhood. There has been a slow expansion of who is deemed to be a person. States have tended to grant personhood preferentially to people most resembling the people making the laws. Others often had a limited form of personhood or none at all. This article states that everyone has a right to the same complete personhood.

rjb

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