responsibility

All posts tagged responsibility

Pierre Puvis de Chavannes – Creative Commons CC0 Public Domain

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) is a milestone document in the history of human rights. Drafted by representatives with different legal and cultural backgrounds from all regions of the world, the Declaration was proclaimed by the United Nations General Assembly in Paris on 10 December 1948 (General Assembly resolution 217 A) as a common standard of achievements for all peoples and all nations. It sets out, for the first time, fundamental human rights to be universally protected and it has been translated into over 500 languages.

Article 24.

Everyone has the right to rest and leisure, including reasonable limitation of working hours and periodic holidays with pay.

I don’t think there’s much I can do to paraphrase or clarify this one. Rest, leisure, limited working hours, paid holiday time. Improving the status of working people with respect to their employers.

rjb

Workers – Pierre Bonnard – Public Domain

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) is a milestone document in the history of human rights. Drafted by representatives with different legal and cultural backgrounds from all regions of the world, the Declaration was proclaimed by the United Nations General Assembly in Paris on 10 December 1948 (General Assembly resolution 217 A) as a common standard of achievements for all peoples and all nations. It sets out, for the first time, fundamental human rights to be universally protected and it has been translated into over 500 languages.

Article 23.

(1) Everyone has the right to work, to free choice of employment, to just and favourable conditions of work and to protection against unemployment.
(2) Everyone, without any discrimination, has the right to equal pay for equal work.
(3) Everyone who works has the right to just and favourable remuneration ensuring for himself and his family an existence worthy of human dignity, and supplemented, if necessary, by other means of social protection.
(4) Everyone has the right to form and to join trade unions for the protection of his interests.

Article twenty-three is about the right to work. It says we should be able to choose what work we do. The working conditions should be good. We should be insured if we become unemployed. We all have a right to equal pay for the same work. The pay should allow us to keep our family with dignity. If the pay is inadequate, it should be supplemented by social security. We all have the right to belong to a trade union.

Things are better than they used to be, sort of. We have many of those rights, even if only in principle. In practice it seems as if the rights are merely tokens of what they could be, in many cases, given grudgingly and ignored whenever possible. There is constant erosion of them, with persistent attempts to to reverse them. We will lose them if we don’t protect them.

rjb

Credit Klemdy – CC-BY-SA

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) is a milestone document in the history of human rights. Drafted by representatives with different legal and cultural backgrounds from all regions of the world, the Declaration was proclaimed by the United Nations General Assembly in Paris on 10 December 1948 (General Assembly resolution 217 A) as a common standard of achievements for all peoples and all nations. It sets out, for the first time, fundamental human rights to be universally protected and it has been translated into over 500 languages.

Article 22.

Everyone, as a member of society, has the right to social security and is entitled to realization, through national effort and international co-operation and in accordance with the organization and resources of each State, of the economic, social and cultural rights indispensable for his dignity and the free development of his personality.

This one is somewhat more abstract than most of the preceding ones. It mentions ‘social security’ and ‘realization of economic, social and cultural rights.’ Social security probably means that all members of society are entitled to economic and social stability. A place where they can grow and live without want or fear. The realization part says people have a right to live with dignity, and with the possibility of fulfilling their potential.

Everyone should be able to be safe and to be their best possible self, and this should be achieved ‘through national effort and international co-operation.’

rjb

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) is a milestone document in the history of human rights. Drafted by representatives with different legal and cultural backgrounds from all regions of the world, the Declaration was proclaimed by the United Nations General Assembly in Paris on 10 December 1948 (General Assembly resolution 217 A) as a common standard of achievements for all peoples and all nations. It sets out, for the first time, fundamental human rights to be universally protected and it has been translated into over 500 languages.

Article 21.

(1) Everyone has the right to take part in the government of his country, directly or through freely chosen representatives.
(2) Everyone has the right of equal access to public service in his country.
(3) The will of the people shall be the basis of the authority of government; this will shall be expressed in periodic and genuine elections which shall be by universal and equal suffrage and shall be held by secret vote or by equivalent free voting procedures.

Governance, public services and free elections. Article 21 says that we all have the right to be involved in the governance of our country, we all have an equal right to the public services available and we all have the right to decide how and by whom our country will be governed.

rjb

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) is a milestone document in the history of human rights. Drafted by representatives with different legal and cultural backgrounds from all regions of the world, the Declaration was proclaimed by the United Nations General Assembly in Paris on 10 December 1948 (General Assembly resolution 217 A) as a common standard of achievements for all peoples and all nations. It sets out, for the first time, fundamental human rights to be universally protected and it has been translated into over 500 languages.

Article 20.

(1) Everyone has the right to freedom of peaceful assembly and association.
(2) No one may be compelled to belong to an association.

We have the right to associate with whomever we want.
We have the freedom to assemble for peaceful purposes.
We have the right to refuse to join an association.

The state can’t tell you which associations you can’t join, provided they’re peaceful, and it can’t tell you which associations you must join either. For instance, there must be no state mandated theological institutions.

rjb