equality

All posts tagged equality

CC-BY-SA – madelgarius

Human Rights — Article Nineteen

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) is a milestone document in the history of human rights. Drafted by representatives with different legal and cultural backgrounds from all regions of the world, the Declaration was proclaimed by the United Nations General Assembly in Paris on 10 December 1948 (General Assembly resolution 217 A) as a common standard of achievements for all peoples and all nations. It sets out, for the first time, fundamental human rights to be universally protected and it has been translated into over 500 languages.

Article 19.

Everyone has the right to freedom of opinion and expression; this right includes freedom to hold opinions without interference and to seek, receive and impart information and ideas through any media and regardless of frontiers.

This is the “free speech” article. It is quite clear as written. We’re free to pursue information and ideas, to hold whatever opinions we want, and to express and promulgate our opinions and any supporting information. This is where people often get confused. Many people seem to think that freedom of expression means that they should be able to say whatever they want without fear of contradiction or criticism. They’ve got the first part right. They are free to say whatever they want. Their mistake is thinking they have that right no matter where they say it. That’s wrong. The people who own the platform have the right to allow or deny them. That’s their freedom. We have the right to create our own platform and control what is said there. That’s our freedom. The other thing that confuses people is their assumption that the freedom to say something means freedom from being responsible for it. If we use our freedom of expression to foster hatred or violence, we are also free to accept the consequences, be they censure or prosecution. As with all rights, this one comes with responsibilities.

rjb

Public Domain

Human Rights — Article Eighteen

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) is a milestone document in the history of human rights. Drafted by representatives with different legal and cultural backgrounds from all regions of the world, the Declaration was proclaimed by the United Nations General Assembly in Paris on 10 December 1948 (General Assembly resolution 217 A) as a common standard of achievements for all peoples and all nations. It sets out, for the first time, fundamental human rights to be universally protected and it has been translated into over 500 languages.

Article 18.

Everyone has the right to freedom of thought, conscience and religion; this right includes freedom to change his religion or belief, and freedom, either alone or in community with others and in public or private, to manifest his religion or belief in teaching, practice, worship and observance.

While this one finishes up as if it’s all about religion and belief, it starts out by mentioning thought and conscience. No one should be able to tell you what to think. No one else can act as your conscience. The choice of religion, to follow one or not and to decide which one it will be if you do, is entirely yours. If you decide to change your religion or to leave them all behind, no one has the right to stop you. To practice or express your beliefs in the way you choose is your right. It doesn’t say so here, but I think it’s pretty obvious that our right to do this doesn’t include the right to negate or curtail anyone else’s rights. The thing about human rights is that they stop there, because rights are universal.

rjb

Public Domain


The Universal Declaration of Human Rights

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) is a milestone document in the history of human rights. Drafted by representatives with different legal and cultural backgrounds from all regions of the world, the Declaration was proclaimed by the United Nations General Assembly in Paris on 10 December 1948 (General Assembly resolution 217 A) as a common standard of achievements for all peoples and all nations. It sets out, for the first time, fundamental human rights to be universally protected and it has been translated into over 500 languages.

Article 17.

(1) Everyone has the right to own property alone as well as in association with others.
(2) No one shall be arbitrarily deprived of his property.

I don’t think this one needs much explanation. We’re all familiar with the concept of property. No one should be property and everyone should have the right to own property, whether it’s the child’s toy or the adult’s house. Their ownership should be protected by law from unjustified seizure.

These days we might say, “No one shall be arbitrarily deprived of their property.”

rjb

Ernest Board – CC0


The Universal Declaration of Human Rights

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) is a milestone document in the history of human rights. Drafted by representatives with different legal and cultural backgrounds from all regions of the world, the Declaration was proclaimed by the United Nations General Assembly in Paris on 10 December 1948 (General Assembly resolution 217 A) as a common standard of achievements for all peoples and all nations. It sets out, for the first time, fundamental human rights to be universally protected and it has been translated into over 500 languages.

Article 16.

(1) Men and women of full age, without any limitation due to race, nationality or religion, have the right to marry and to found a family. They are entitled to equal rights as to marriage, during marriage and at its dissolution.
(2) Marriage shall be entered into only with the free and full consent of the intending spouses.
(3) The family is the natural and fundamental group unit of society and is entitled to protection by society and the State.

Marriage and family. Since the family is the fundamental unit of society, it must be protected. Since marriage is the strongest bond two people can form, it must be able to be entered into freely and consensually by both parties. Both parties must have equal rights in all aspects and stages of marriage. These rights must not be abrogated due to race, nationality or religion. I believe if they were writing this article today, they would include other factors like sexual orientation.

rjb

Credit Hanson Phan – CC-BY-SA

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) is a milestone document in the history of human rights. Drafted by representatives with different legal and cultural backgrounds from all regions of the world, the Declaration was proclaimed by the United Nations General Assembly in Paris on 10 December 1948 (General Assembly resolution 217 A) as a common standard of achievements for all peoples and all nations. It sets out, for the first time, fundamental human rights to be universally protected and it has been translated into over 500 languages.

Article 15.

(1) Everyone has the right to a nationality.
(2) No one shall be arbitrarily deprived of his nationality nor denied the right to change his nationality.

This seems obvious in this age of nations. One of the fundamental attributes of a person is their nationality. It’s not a given, though. There is always the threat of disenfranchisement, and article 15 is meant to prevent that. We are all entitled to have, keep or change our nationality.

rjb